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Restricted Stock Units – RSU 08.04.2021

Restricted Stock Units (RSUs) can be a significant component of an employee’s compensation package. But what exactly is an RSU? How are they treated for tax purposes? How do you plan most effectively when your RSUs vest? The 411 on Restricted Stock Units will tackle these questions and more.

What are Restricted Stock Units?

RSUs, also commonly known as restricted stock shares, are a form of stock based compensation whereby an employee receives rights to shares of stock in a company that are subject to certain restrictions. These units do not represent actual ownership or equity interest in the company and as such hold no dividend or voting rights. (1) However, once the restriction is lifted, the units are converted to actual company shares and an employee owns the  shares outright (same as traditional stock ownership).  

The restriction on the units is generally based on a vesting schedule. Most vesting schedules will fall into one of two categories:

  • Time-based: based on the period of employment. Common time-based vesting schedules are between three to five years and are either pro-rata or “cliff” based. For a “cliff” based schedule, all shares vest fully at the end of the schedule.       
  • Performance-based: based on the company achieving a performance goal. Common performance-based vesting schedules are based on a company achieving a particular stock price or a return on equity, or earnings per share.    

    *There is a hybrid-approach between time-based and performance-based known as time-accelerated. Vesting is on a time-based schedule but may be accelerated by the company achieving a performance-based goal.  

How Are RSUs Different Than Vested Stock Options?

When most people think of stock based compensation, vested stock options, or the right to buy a company’s stock at some future date at a price established now (the strike price), are typically what first comes to mind.  

Historically, vested stock options have been the most popular form of stock based compensation. And up until 2004, stock options merited favorable accounting treatment as a company could avoid recognizing compensation expense by issuing the options.  

In 2004, this loophole was eliminated and subsequently RSUs/restricted stock shares, aka units, emerged as the preferred form of equity compensation.  

RSUs and stock options have some notable differences:

RSU Vested Stock Options Restricted Stock Units

Scenario 1: An employee is granted 1,000 RSUs when the market price of the company’s stock is $10. When the RSUs vest, the stock price has fallen to $8. The shares are still worth $8,000 to the employee.  

Scenario 2: An employee is granted 1,000 stock options with a strike price of $10. During the window to exercise these vested options, the market price of the stock is always below $10. These options will expire worthless to the employee.  

*There are many other forms of nontraditional compensation, such as Stock Appreciation Rights (SARs), Phantom Stock, and Profit Interests. None of these are as widely used as RSUs or Stock Options and will not be a focus in this paper.

What Is the Taxation of Restricted Stock Units?

RSUs are taxed upon delivery of the shares (i.e., when the restriction has been lifted).     

At time of delivery, the shares are included in an employee’s taxable income as compensation at the fair market value of the total shares. The taxation of restricted stock units is identical to normal wage income and as such, is included on an employee’s W-2. (3)    

Taxation of Restricted Stock Units? Shares Stock Market White Paper Towerpoint Wealth

The shares are subject to federal and employment tax (Social Security and Medicare) and state and local tax as well.     

For paying the taxes due on delivery, companies will provide an employee with either one uniform withholding method or several options as follows:

  • Net-settlement:a company “holds back” shares to cover the taxes and then the company pays the tax from its own cash reserve. This is the most common practice.      
  • Pay cash: an employee receives all shares and covers the income tax burden out of their own pocket. This is a riskier strategy than net-settlement, as it results simultaneously in a more concentrated equity allocation and lower cash balance (less money to pay the taxes).
  • Sell to cover:an employee sells the shares needed to cover the income tax burden on their own. This method provides no real advantage over net-settlement and places the additional burden of selling the shares on the employee.   

When an employee ultimately sells their vested shares, they will pay capital gains tax on any appreciation over the market price of the shares on the vesting date. If the shares are held longer than one year after vesting, the sales proceeds will be taxed at the more favorable long-term capital gains rate. (4)

Restricted Stock Units Stock Options Vesting Dates Towerpoint Wealth

Taxation of Restricted Stock Units Example:

An employee is granted 750 Restricted Stock Units on January 1, 2018. The market price of the stock at the time of

An employee is granted 750 RSUs on January 1, 2018. The market price of the stock at the time of grant is $10 and the RSUs vest pro-rata over three years: 

Each increment is taxable on its vesting date as ordinary income. The total ordinary income paid over the three years is $11,500. 

Each increment is taxable on its vesting date as ordinary income. The total ordinary income paid over the three years is $11,500.

The employee then sells all 750 shares of stock three years after the last shares vest:

The employee held each share for more than one year, so the gain is treated as long-term. The employee’s long-term capital gain is $11,000 ($22,500 less $11,500) to be reported on Schedule D of their U.S. individual tax return.

What Are the Risks of Holding RSUs?

Utilized correctly, restricted stock units/restricted stock shares can be a wonderful complement to a traditional compensation package and can contribute substantially to an employee’s net worth. (5) This can be, however, a double-edged sword.

The overlying risk is that an employee can have too much of their net worth concentrated in one individual stock and for that matter, one individual company.

Let’s explore a scenario:

Jim has a net worth of $200,000, not including 2,000 shares of RSUs with his employer,  Snap Inc. On January 1, 2019, 100% of Jim’s 2,000 RSUs vest at $50 per share.

Great news! Jim’s net worth, on paper, has now increased by $100,000 overnight. Jim’s overall net worth is now $300,000

Jim decides to keep all his shares in Snap Inc. with the belief the stock price will continue to go up. 

He also sees his colleagues choosing to hold most of their shares, and fears that if Snap Inc.’s price soars, he will have missed out and his colleagues will all become wealthier than him. 

On July 1, 2019, Snap Inc. releases a weak earnings report and the share price drops to $20. Jim’s net worth is now $240,000, down 20% from January 1st. 

Even worse, Jim paid taxes at his ordinary rate on the original share value of $100,000 when the shares are now only worth $40,000.

And finally, because Jim has a significant portion of his net worth in the company he works for, he faces an additional and potentially catastrophic risk. What if Snap Inc. runs into serious financial struggles and he loses his job? Not only will Jim’s net worth plunge from further declines in Snap Inc.’s share price, he also will now have lost his primary source of income.

How Can I Most Effectively Plan for RSUs?

We recommend you discuss how to effectively plan for RSU shares with your financial advisor to ensure a decision is not made in a vacuum, but rather in the broader spectrum of your entire financial picture. Of course, we encourage collaboration with your tax advisor to determine the optimal strategy from a tax perspective as well.  

In reality, when RSUs vest, you may be better off by immediately (or over a short-term schedule) selling a sizeable portion of the vested units and using the proceeds to add to or build a diversified investment portfolio.    

Regardless, before you make any decisions, it can be helpful to explore the following questions:   

  • How much of your overall wealth is tied up in RSUs?  
  • Is your company growing quickly or slowly?   
  • What is your current tax situation? Is it better to wait more than one year after the shares vest to sell them to receive the more favorable long-term capital gains tax treatment?  
  • How long do you plan to be with the company?
  • What is your tolerance for risk?
  • If the market value of the stock was instead received in the form of a cash bonus, how much of this would you invest in the company stock?   

How can we Help?

While we at Towerpoint Wealth continue to believe in the importance of a diversified portfolio, we also understand every individual situation is unique, what growing net worth means to each individual is different, and understand emotions can play a significant albeit oftentimes problematic role in making sound financial decisions. This is especially the case for RSUs. If you would like to speak further about RSUs (or any nontraditional compensation for that matter), I encourage you to call, 916-405-9166, or Steve Pitchford (Sacramento Certified Financial Planner) email spitchford@towerpointwealth.com.

Download The 411 on Restricted Stock Units, RSUs

Learn more about Restricted Stock Units on our YouTube Channel

(1)   While RSUs hold no automatic dividend rights, companies may choose to issue dividend equivalents. For example, when a company pays cash dividends to common stock holders, RSUs can be credited dividends for the same amount. These credits may ultimately be used to pay the taxes due when RSUs vest or can simply be paid out in cash.

(2) Stock Options can either be Incentive Stock Options (ISOs) or Nonqualified Stock Options (NQOs). They are treated differently for tax purposes.  

(3) When received, dividend equivalents are subject to the same tax rules as RSUs.

(4) Important to note that the shares must be held more than one year for long-term capital gains treatment. If sold exactly one year from the vesting date, they will be taxed at the higher short-term capital gains. 

(5) Net worth means the total value of all of an individual’s assets less their liabilities.

Towerpoint Wealth, LLC is a Registered Investment Adviser. This material is solely for informational purposes. Advisory services are only offered to clients or prospective clients where Towerpoint Wealth, LLC and its representatives are properly licensed or exempt from licensure. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns. Investing involves risk and possible loss of principal capital. No advice may be rendered by Towerpoint Wealth, LLC unless a client service agreement is in place.

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Questions to Ask if Building Wealth is the Task 05.28.2021

As we sit on the eve of 2021’s Memorial Day Weekend, 73% of those in a Quinnipiac poll said their plans are similar to the ones they had pre-pandemic. The light at the end of the pandemic tunnel is getting brighter and brighter by the day!

building Wealth Questions to Ask

We’re looking at plunging COVID-19 case and death rates and widening vaccination uptake rates here in the United States, in addition to an uptake in exuberance and economic optimism by investors that has driven the stock market to all time highs. And, as is typically true during periods of market extremes, the talking heads, market strategists, investment gurus, and even your brother-in-law Frank seem to have all the answers as to why this is happening, and what lies around the corner. Our advice to you: Ignore this nonsense, and ignore them all.

Rather than become enamored by these predictions and/or fall prey to a well-articulated story spun by a seemingly well-credentialed “expert,” we encourage you to tune out this noise, and not worry nor think too much or too hard about interest rates, cryptocurrencies, inflation, China, large caps and small caps, mask mandates, or the U.S. deficit. Don’t worry about what the “new normal” means, and don’t get too worked up about “getting your share” of the possible American Jobs Plan or the American Families Plan stimulus packages (we’re purposefully not even linking to any of these themes). Instead, let’s channel our energy and attention into things that we have control over.


While we do believe you should always be ready for the unexpected, we also feel it is way more important to understand and internalize a number of foundational investing and wealth building principles. Ask yourself if you can succinctly and confidently answer the following questions:

  • Can I remain objective and rational, and recognize when you are being fearful, greedy, and emotional about your money? Your worst investment enemy is usually found by looking in the mirror. The limbic system is a wonderfully complex set of brain structures that deal with emotions, but activating your fight or flight response in reaction to fear, greed, and anger is not conducive to successful investing or successful longer-term wealth building. 
  • Do I understand that my neighbors, friends, and co-workers are perhaps confused and delusional? Not only do they probably spend too much and boast too much about their portfolio, but the chances their financial decisions are rooted in any of the principles listed here are quite low.
  • Am I trying to simply make money, or am I working to build and protect my wealth? We equate the former to gambling, and the latter to investing. While anything can happen on a daily, weekly, monthly, and even annual basis, we believe your odds of success increase significantly if you establish and follow a disciplined longer-term wealth building plan.
  • What am I doing to proactively insulate my downside from a major catastrophe during a market correction? We believe this is way more important than hitting a home run during a period of market strength. While his two rules are a bit binary, the spirit of Warren Buffett’s quote should resonate:
  • Why am I investing, and do I have a plan? For obvious reasons, it is invaluable to not only think through, articulate, and quantify the goals and vision you have for your and your family’s future, but also to have a methodology for how you attend to your personal financial decision-making. And this methodology will be different than your friend’s, neighbor’s, or co-worker’s, as we all obviously have different things that motivate us and that we ultimately want out of life. This is assuming that your friend, neighbor, or co-worker even has a plan at all.
  • Do I recognize that costs, fees, expenses, and taxes matter? At Towerpoint Wealth, we call them “necessary evils” to helping clients grow and protect their net worth. And while we can never eliminate the drag that costs, fees, expenses, and taxes creates, we certainly can work to identify, and reduce, these friction points.
  • Am I aware that saving money is the single most effective way to build my wealth and to retire? While you need to have balance between saving for tomorrow and living your life today, the capital you spend today is capital no longer available to fund your retirement. Saving money equals peace of mind.

Towerpoint Wealth Turns Four!

On May 26, 2017, with zero clients and $0 in assets under management, we officially launched Towerpoint Wealth. Classified as a “bold,” “risky,” “fearless,” and “courageous” decision by our clients and colleagues, it fortunately turned out to be a prescient and extremely positive one based on the feedback we continue to receive and strategic growth we continue to experience.

Today, we are approaching $350 million in assets under management, and continue to be thrilled to serve YOU, always striving to expand your peace of mind by helping you remove the hassle of properly coordinating your financial affairs.

What’s Happening at TPW?

The Towerpoint Wealth crew recently spent some time in a professional photo shoot with Tim Engle, of Tim Engle Photography – below is one of our favorite shots from the session.

We hold our collective noses to the grindstone at Towerpoint Wealth ~ 97% of the time. However, the culture we have built at the firm is also predicated on spending time outside the office and having fun together as a work family, which is why we regularly schedule fun teambuilding events.

We had an enjoyable “hooky afternoon” earlier this month, pedaling through midtown Sacramento on the Sacramento Brew Bike, with pit stops at Public House DowntownKupros, and The Golden Bear. A well-behaved and fun afternoon!

TPW Service Highlight – RETIREMENT – Building wealth

We only semi-jokingly say that you can retire any time you want, but will you be able to with the lifestyle and income stream you desire?

At Towerpoint Wealth, we believe that everyone deserves a secure retirement, and we stand ready to help you with a myriad of retirement-specific tools and planning considerations. The cornerstone of this process is the development of a customized retirement and financial plan using our modeling software from RightCapital(R).

Click HERE to review a sample customized RightCapital financial plan.

Additional retirement-specific services include sustainable and tax-efficient retirement income planning, “black swan” event planning and modeling, customized Social Security benefit election optimization analysis, corporate pension modeling and optimization, fixed/variable/immediate annuity analysis, and optimal-retirement-age projections.

Chart of the Week

Real estate values continue to be on fire! Click HERE to watch an excellent video in which our President, Joseph Eschleman discusses the white hot Sacramento real estate market with long-time Sacramento realtor, Brian Kassis.

And while there is no question about the tremendous price increases homeowners have experienced over the past year and a half, the chart below makes an interesting comparison between the value of the stock market (using the S&P 500 as a proxy) and the value of residential real estate (using the Case Shiller U.S. National Home Price Index as a proxy) over the past 30 years.

Understanding the importance of owning both real estate AND equities when working to build net worth, and recognizing that people seem to be more relational to the increases in the value of their home, the chart below from Visual Capitalist is an eye-opener!

In addition to home prices going up and U.S. COVID numbers going down, a number of trending and notable events have occurred over the past few weeks:

As always, we sincerely value our relationships and partnerships with each of you, as well as your trust and confidence in us here at Towerpoint Wealth. We encourage you to reach out to us at any time (916-405-9140, info@towerpointwealth.com) with any questions, concerns, or needs you may have. The world continues to be an extremely unsettled and complicated place, and we are here to help you properly plan for and make sense of it.

– Joseph, Jonathan, Steve, Lori, Nathan, and Michelle

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Restricted Stock Units | RSU 04.28.2021

Restricted Stock Units | A common program many publicly traded companies offer to their employees is an Employee Stock Purchase Plan. But ESPPs aren’t the only stock plan out there. Many companies have a different type of stock compensation program that allows them to grant you shares, called Restricted Stock Units, or RSUs for short. 

Restricted Stock Units are a way for an employer to compensate employees by granting them actual shares of company stock. The grant is “restricted” because it is subject to a vesting schedule. Therefore, the employee typically only receives the shares after the vesting date. Once the shares are delivered, the grant is considered compensation income and your taxable income is the market value of the shares.  

When you later sell the shares, you will also recognize income on any appreciation over and above the market price of the shares back on the vesting date. Your holding period will determine whether the gain is subject to short-term ordinary income rates, or lower long-term capital gains rates. 

Watch this video from our Sacramento Wealth Advisor and CPA, Matt Regan, to learn the taxation rules associated with RSUs, and the importance of planning to limit your overall tax liability.

Sacramento Certified Public Account, Matt Regan
Sacramento Wealth Advisor | Sacramento Financial Advisor

Restricted Stock Units, RSUs | Last week, I spoke about a common program many publicly traded companies offer to their employees, an Employee Stock Purchase Plan, or ESPP for short. If you recall, these plans afford you an opportunity to buy shares of the company you work for at a discounted price. But ESPPs aren’t the only stock plan out there. Many companies have a different type of stock compensation program that allows them to grant you shares, called Restricted Stock Units, or RSUs for short. 

Hi Everyone, Matt Regan here from Towerpoint Wealth, and today I am going to discuss the basics of RSUs.

As I just mentioned, RSUs are a way for an employer to compensate employees by granting them actual shares of company stock. The grant is “restricted” because it is subject to a vesting schedule. As you would expect, the employee typically only receives the shares after the vesting date. 

Vesting schedules are often time-based, requiring you to work at the company for a certain period before your RSUs begin to vest. A common schedule is a “graded” vesting schedule, which means the vesting of the grant occurs in serial portions. Vesting schedules can also have “cliff” vesting, which means 100% of the RSU grant vests after you have completed a specific stated service period of say three or four years. And finally, the vesting schedule can also be performance-based, meaning tied to company-specific or stock-market targets.

With RSUs, you are only taxed when the shares are delivered, which is almost always at vesting. Your taxable income is the market value of the shares upon vesting. The grant is considered compensation income, and is subject to mandatory federal, state, and local income and employment tax withholding. The most common practice of paying these taxes is by surrendering the necessary amount of newly delivered shares back to the company. This holds or “tenders” shares to cover your tax obligation. When you later sell the shares, you will also recognize income on any appreciation over and above the market price of the shares back on the vesting date. Your holding period will obviously determine whether the gain is subject to short-term ordinary income rates, or lower long-term capital gains rates. 

So, there you have it. While RSU’s may not be as complicated as ESPP plans, the tax planning for them is just as important. Understanding when your shares will vest gives you the opportunity to plan in advance to ensure you can limit your overall tax liability. Feel free to contact me on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Instagram to discuss the taxation of RSU’s in greater detail. Thanks, and have a great day.

Matt Regan No Comments

Trading vs. Investing 04.15.2021

Trading vs. Investing | These two terms Trading vs. Investing are often used interchangeably by many, understanding the goal of both is to generate profit in the stock market. However, they represent two very different philosophies in how you approach the market. 

Oftentimes when we watch movies and TV shows about the stock market, we see a Gordon Gekko-type of character, quickly buying and selling stocks, making the big bucks, and living an opulent life. They make trading look seductive. But, as you would expect, it can be a very risky enterprise.

Investing, on the other hand, involves strategically buying an asset you expect to rise in value over time, independent of any shorter-term movements in its price. Investors usually have a longer-term time horizon, and look to build wealth through *discipline*, gradual appreciation, and compound interest.

Watch this video from our Sacramento Wealth Advisor and CPA, Matt Regan, to learn the pros and cons of both investment philosophies and how you can incorporate both approaches into your own portfolio.  

Sacramento Certified Public Account, Matt Regan | mregan@towerpointwealth.com
Sacramento Wealth Advisor | Sacramento Financial Advisor | Trading vs. Investing

Trading vs investing | Two terms that are often used interchangeably by many, understanding the goal of both is to generate profit in the stock market. However, they represent two very different philosophies in how you approach the market. Depending on your level of market expertise, time availability, risk tolerance, emotional discipline, and goals, one of these approaches may be better for you than the other.

Hi Everyone, Matt Regan here from Towerpoint Wealth, and today I am going to discuss the differences between Trading vs investing, and why you would want to incorporate either of these philosophies into your investment strategy.

Oftentimes when we watch movies and TV shows about the stock market, we see a Gordon Gekko-type of character, quickly buying and selling stocks, making the big bucks, and living an opulent life. They make trading look seductive. Trading focuses on timing market moves and buying and selling individual stocks within a short period of time to generate quick profits. As you would expect, it can be a very risky enterprise. If a trade doesn’t go your way, you can lose a lot of money in a very short period of time. The costs of short-term trading are also greater. The more trades you execute, the more fees or commissions you might have to pay. Also, any quick gains that are made will be subject to higher ordinary income tax rates, and not the lower long-term capital gains tax rate. These two costs can be a huge drag on overall portfolio growth.

Investing, on the other hand, involves strategically buying an asset you expect to rise in value over time, independent of any shorter-term movements in its price. Investors usually have a longer-term time horizon, and look to build wealth through discipline, gradual appreciation, and compound interest. Investors typically own a well-diversified portfolio of investments, and only sparingly make major adjustments. Since investors are not constantly buying and selling, the overall costs and drag on the portfolio oftentimes is lower as well. So, while investing may not be fast paced, nor exciting, at Towerpoint Wealth, we feel it is the best way to gain the highest return at the lowest risk.

So, there you have it. Both ways of approaching the stock market have their pros and cons. If you’re comfortable with the risks, trading can be an exciting way to earn quick profits. If reducing risk and taking a more methodical approach to building your net worth are your main goals, then you’ll want to stick with a longer-term investment philosophy. Regardless, these philosophies don’t need to be mutually exclusive, and if you are interested in learning how you can incorporate both approaches into your own portfolio, feel free to contact me on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Instagram for some expert guidance and to have a no-strings-attached conversation. Thanks, and have a great day.

Matt Regan No Comments

Coinbase | Largest cryptocurrency exchange 04.15.2021

Today, Coinbase Global Inc., the largest cryptocurrency exchange platform in the U.S., went public on the Nasdaq exchange via a direct listing under the ticker symbol COIN. Coinbase is the world’s third largest digital asset exchange, and by far the most well-known cryptocurrency exchange platform in the US. COIN provides a service that helps its users easily secure direct ownership of cryptocurrencies.

For years, cryptocurrency has faced skepticism and resistance, but the floodgates appear to continue to be opening as banks and businesses have begun accepting Bitcoin for transactions or investing heavily into it with corporate cash. Many people see Coinbase’s arrival on the stock market as further validation for cryptocurrencies, and a great PR opportunity for the entire crypto industry.

Watch this video from our Sacramento Wealth Advisor and CPA, Matt Regan, to learn more about Coinbase, what it means for the cryptocurrency world, and what it means for individual investors like you and me.

Sacramento Certified Public Account, Matt Regan
Sacramento Wealth Advisor | Sacramento Financial Advisor

Over the past year, Bitcoin has been on a tear. On April 13, 2020, a single coin was valued at $6,879. At the close of yesterday, a single coin was valued at $63,291, an 820% increase in value in just one year, just remarkable. This is clear evidence of just how much cryptocurrencies have continued to be viewed as a legitimate asset. And cryptos received another boost today, as Coinbase, the largest cryptocurrency exchange platform in the U.S., went public on the Nasdaq exchange via a direct listing, under the ticker symbol COIN.

Hi Everyone, Matt Regan here from Towerpoint Wealth, and today I am going discuss what Coinbase is, what it means for the cryptocurrency world, and what it means for individual investors like you and me.

Coinbase is the world’s third largest digital asset exchange, and by far the most well-known cryptocurrency exchange platform in the US. “COIN” provides a service that helps its users easily secure direct ownership of cryptocurrencies. About 90% of Coinbase’s revenue is currently derived directly from retail trading, with most if that here in the U.S., and centered primarily on the two largest cryptocurrencies: 1. Bitcoin and 2. Ethereum. The benefits to owning shares of Coinbase? Revenue and profit increase as interest and demand in cryptocurrencies continues to increase. The risks? ONE: The possibility for stricter governmental regulations, and TWO: Business and financial conditions for Coinbase could be negatively affected if demand for Bitcoin and Ethereum declines and is not replaced by new demand for other crypto assets.

For years, cryptocurrency has faced skepticism and resistance. Just this past February, Warren Buffett said “Cryptocurrencies basically have no value, and they don’t produce anything. I don’t have any cryptocurrency and I never will.” But at least for now, Warren appears to be wrong, as the floodgates appear to continue to be opening. Banks, credit card companies, professional sports franchises, and even automakers have begun to make moves into the space, either by accepting Bitcoin for transactions, or by investing heavily into it with corporate cash. Many people see Coinbase’s arrival on the stock market as further validation for cryptocurrencies, and a great PR opportunity for the entire crypto industry.

As cryptos become more mainstream, we feel confident that it doesn’t mean volatility will decrease. Just like mainstream markets, news developments and speculation fuel price swings. Crypto markets are less liquid than traditional financial markets, so this heightened volatility and a lack of liquidity can create a dangerous combination, as oftentimes they both feed off of each other. As a result, it is very important investors have a long-term investment strategy and the ability to control their financial emotions during these expected wild fluctuations. If you are interested in discussing how cryptocurrencies can fit into your own financial plan, contact me, Matt Regan, on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Instagram. Thanks, and have a great day.

Matt Regan No Comments

Suitability vs. Fiduciary

When hiring a financial advisor, you expect him or her to always act in your best interests, 100% of the time, right? Unfortunately, this is not always the case. Click below and watch a quick video from Matt Regan, and learn about the important difference between the fiduciary standard and the suitability standard, how they can impact your financial and wealth management plan, and ultimately, your success in growing and protecting your net worth and assets.