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Restricted Stock Units – RSU 05.01.2021

Restricted Stock Units (RSUs) can be a significant component of an employee’s compensation package. But what exactly is an RSU? How are they treated for tax purposes? How do you plan most effectively when your RSUs vest? The 411 on Restricted Stock Units will tackle these questions and more.

What are Restricted Stock Units?

RSUs are a form of stock compensation whereby an employee receives rights to shares of stock in a company that are subject to certain restrictions. These units do not represent actual ownership or equity interest in the company and as such hold no dividend or voting right. (While RSUs hold no automatic dividend rights, companies may choose to issue dividend equivalents. For example, when a company pays cash dividends to common stock holders, RSUs can be credited dividends for the same amount. These credits may ultimately be used to pay the taxes due when RSUs vest or can simply be paid out in cash.) However, once the restriction is lifted, the units are converted to actual company shares and an employee owns the shares outright (same as traditional stock ownership).

The restriction on the units is generally based on a vesting schedule. Most vesting schedules will fall into one of two categories:

  • Time-based: based on the period of employment. Common time-based vesting schedules are between three to five years and are either pro-rata or “cliff” based. For a “cliff” based schedule, all shares vest fully at the end of the schedule.
  • Performance-based: based on the company achieving a performance goal. Common performance-based vesting schedules are based on a company achieving a particular stock price or a return on equity, or earnings per share.

*There is a hybrid-approach between time-based and performance-based known as time- accelerated. Vesting is on a time-based schedule but may be accelerated by the company achieving a performance-based goal.

How are RSUs different than stock options?

When most people think of stock compensation, stock options, or the right to buy a company’s stock at some future date at a price established now (the strike price), are typically what first comes to mind.

Historically, stock options have been the most popular form of stock compensation. And up until 2004, stock options merited favorable accounting treatment as a company could avoid recognizing compensation expense by issuing the options.

In 2004, this loophole was eliminated and subsequently, RSUs emerged as the preferred form of equity compensation.

RSUs and stock options have some notable differences:

Restricted Stock Units RSUs Stock Options Towerpoint Wealth

Scenario 1: An employee is granted 1,000 Restricted Stock Units when the market price of the company’s stock is $10. When the RSUs vest, the stock price has fallen to $8. The shares are still worth $8,000 to the employee.

Scenario 2: An employee is granted 1,000 stock options with a strike price of $10. During the window to exercise these options, the market price of the stock is always below $10. These options will expire worthless to the employee.

*There are many other forms of nontraditional compensation, such as Stock Appreciation Rights (SARs), Phantom Stock, and Profit Interests. None of these are as widely used as RSUs or Stock Options and will not be a focus in this paper.

How are RSUs Taxed?

RSUs are taxed upon delivery of the shares (i.e. when the restriction has been lifted).

At time of delivery, the shares are included in an employee’s taxable income as compensation at the fair market value of the total shares. The tax treatment is identical to normal wage income and as such, is included on an employee’s W-2. (When received, dividend equivalents are subject to the same tax rules as RSUs.)

The shares are subject to federal and employment tax (Social Security and Medicare) and state and local tax as well.

For paying the taxes due on delivery, companies will provide an employee with either one uniform withholding method or several options as follows:

  • Net-settlement: a company “holds back” shares to cover the taxes and then the company pays the tax from its own cash reserve. This is the most common practice.
  • Pay cash: an employee receives all shares and covers the income tax burden out of their own pocket. This is a riskier strategy than net-settlement, as the result is a more concentrated equity allocation in their portfolio while at the same time reducing their cash balance by the amount needed to pay the taxes.
  • Sell to cover: an employee sells the shares needed to cover the income tax burden on their own. This method provides no real advantage over net-settlement and places the additional burden of selling the shares on the employee.

When an employee ultimately sells their vested shares, they will pay capital gains tax on any appreciation over the market price of the shares on the vesting date. If the shares are held longer than one year after vesting, the sales proceeds will be taxed at the more favorable long-term capital gains rate. (Important to note that the shares must be held more than one year for long-term capital gains treatment. If sold exactly one year from the vesting date, they will be taxed at the higher short-term capital gains.)

Restricted Stock Units Stock Options Vesting Dates Towerpoint Wealth

Example:

An employee is granted 750 Restricted Stock Units on January 1, 2018. The market price of the stock at the time of grant is $10 and the RSUs vest pro-rata over three years:

January 1, 2019:Stock price is $12250 shares X $12 = $3,000 of ordinary income
January 1, 2020:Stock price is $15250 shares X $14 = $3,500 of ordinary income
January 1, 2021:Stock price is $20250 shares X $20 = $5,000 of ordinary income

Each increment is taxable on its vesting date as ordinary income. The total ordinary income paid over the three years is $11,500.

The employee then sells all 750 shares of stock three years after the last shares vest:

January 1, 2024:                                    Stock price is $30.              750 X $30 = $22,500 realized upon sale

The employee held each share for more than one year, so the gain is treated as long-term. The

employee’s long-term capital gain is $11,000 ($22,500 less $11,500) to be reported on Schedule D of their U.S. individual tax return.

What are the risks of holding RSUs?

Utilized correctly, Restricted Stock Units can be a wonderful complement to a traditional compensation package and can contribute substantially to an employee’s net worth. This can be, however, a double-edged sword.

The overlying risk is that an employee can have too much of their net worth concentrated in one individual stock and for that matter, one individual company.

Utilized correctly, RSUs can be a wonderful complement to a traditional compensation package and can contribute substantially to an employee’s net worth. This can be, however, a double-edged sword.

Let’s explore a scenario:

Jim has a net worth of $200,000, not including 2,000 shares of RSUs with his employer, Snap Inc. On January 1, 2019, 100% of Jim’s 2,000 RSUs vest at $50 per share.

Great news! Jim’s net worth, on paper, has now increased by $100,000 overnight. Jim’s overall net worth is now $300,000.

Jim decides to keep all his shares in Snap Inc. with the belief the stock price will continue to go up.

He also sees his colleagues choosing to hold most of their shares, and fears that if Snap Inc.’s price soars, he will have missed out and his colleagues will all become wealthier than him.

On July 1, 2019, Snap Inc. releases a weak earnings report and the share price drops to $20. Jim’s net worth is now $240,000, down 20% from January 1st.

Even worse, Jim paid taxes at his ordinary rate on the original share value of $100,000 when the shares are now only worth $40,000.

And finally, because Jim has a significant portion of his net worth in the company he works for, he faces an additional and potentially catastrophic risk. What if Snap Inc. runs into serious financial struggles and he loses his job? Not only will Jim’s net worth plunge from further declines in Snap Inc.’s share price, he also will now have lost his primary source of income.

You probably see Jim as foolish but his predicament is a common one. We often see employees dealing with the hesitation to sell the shares for emotional but not always rational reasons.

How can I most effectively plan for RSUs?

We recommend you discuss how to effectively plan for Restricted Stock Units shares with your financial advisor to ensure a decision is not made in a vacuum, but rather in the broader spectrum of your entire financial picture. Of course, we encourage collaboration with your tax advisor to determine the optimal strategy from a tax perspective as well.

In reality, when RSUs vest, you may be better off by immediately (or over a short-term schedule) selling a sizeable portion of the vested units and using the proceeds to add to or build a diversified investment portfolio.

Regardless, before you make any decisions, it can be helpful to explore the following questions:

  • How much of your overall wealth is tied up in RSUs?
  • Is your company growing quickly or slowly?
  • What is your current tax situation? Is it better to wait more than one year after the shares vest to sell them to receive the more favorable long-term capital gains tax treatment? (Reminder: If you sell RSUs one year or less after vesting, the difference between the market value at sale versus at vesting will be taxed at the less favorable short-term capital gains rate. However, a near immediate sale should result in a minimal gain and thus, a minimal tax hit.)
  • How long do you plan to be with the company?
  • What is your tolerance for risk?
  • If the market value of the stock was instead received in the form of a cash bonus, how much of this would you invest in the company stock?

How can we Help?

While we at Towerpoint Wealth continue to believe in the importance of a diversified portfolio, we also understand every individual situation is unique and understand emotions can play a significant albeit oftentimes problematic role in making sound financial decisions. This is especially the case for RSUs.

If you would like to speak further about RSUs (or any nontraditional compensation for that matter), I encourage you to call, 916-405-9166, or Steve Pitchford (Sacramento Certified Financial Planner) email spitchford@towerpointwealth.com.

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Towerpoint Wealth, LLC is a Registered Investment Adviser. This material is solely for informational purposes. Advisory services are only offered to clients or prospective clients where Towerpoint Wealth, LLC and its representatives are properly licensed or exempt from licensure. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns. Investing involves risk and possible loss of principal capital. No advice may be rendered by Towerpoint Wealth, LLC unless a client service agreement is in place.

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Restricted Stock Units | RSU 04.28.2021

Restricted Stock Units | A common program many publicly traded companies offer to their employees is an Employee Stock Purchase Plan. But ESPPs aren’t the only stock plan out there. Many companies have a different type of stock compensation program that allows them to grant you shares, called Restricted Stock Units, or RSUs for short. 

Restricted Stock Units are a way for an employer to compensate employees by granting them actual shares of company stock. The grant is “restricted” because it is subject to a vesting schedule. Therefore, the employee typically only receives the shares after the vesting date. Once the shares are delivered, the grant is considered compensation income and your taxable income is the market value of the shares.  

When you later sell the shares, you will also recognize income on any appreciation over and above the market price of the shares back on the vesting date. Your holding period will determine whether the gain is subject to short-term ordinary income rates, or lower long-term capital gains rates. 

Watch this video from our Sacramento Wealth Advisor and CPA, Matt Regan, to learn the taxation rules associated with RSUs, and the importance of planning to limit your overall tax liability.

Sacramento Certified Public Account, Matt Regan
Sacramento Wealth Advisor | Sacramento Financial Advisor

Restricted Stock Units, RSUs | Last week, I spoke about a common program many publicly traded companies offer to their employees, an Employee Stock Purchase Plan, or ESPP for short. If you recall, these plans afford you an opportunity to buy shares of the company you work for at a discounted price. But ESPPs aren’t the only stock plan out there. Many companies have a different type of stock compensation program that allows them to grant you shares, called Restricted Stock Units, or RSUs for short. 

Hi Everyone, Matt Regan here from Towerpoint Wealth, and today I am going to discuss the basics of RSUs.

As I just mentioned, RSUs are a way for an employer to compensate employees by granting them actual shares of company stock. The grant is “restricted” because it is subject to a vesting schedule. As you would expect, the employee typically only receives the shares after the vesting date. 

Vesting schedules are often time-based, requiring you to work at the company for a certain period before your RSUs begin to vest. A common schedule is a “graded” vesting schedule, which means the vesting of the grant occurs in serial portions. Vesting schedules can also have “cliff” vesting, which means 100% of the RSU grant vests after you have completed a specific stated service period of say three or four years. And finally, the vesting schedule can also be performance-based, meaning tied to company-specific or stock-market targets.

With RSUs, you are only taxed when the shares are delivered, which is almost always at vesting. Your taxable income is the market value of the shares upon vesting. The grant is considered compensation income, and is subject to mandatory federal, state, and local income and employment tax withholding. The most common practice of paying these taxes is by surrendering the necessary amount of newly delivered shares back to the company. This holds or “tenders” shares to cover your tax obligation. When you later sell the shares, you will also recognize income on any appreciation over and above the market price of the shares back on the vesting date. Your holding period will obviously determine whether the gain is subject to short-term ordinary income rates, or lower long-term capital gains rates. 

So, there you have it. While RSU’s may not be as complicated as ESPP plans, the tax planning for them is just as important. Understanding when your shares will vest gives you the opportunity to plan in advance to ensure you can limit your overall tax liability. Feel free to contact me on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Instagram to discuss the taxation of RSU’s in greater detail. Thanks, and have a great day.

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Employee Stock Purchase Plan 04.21.2021

Employee Stock Purchase Plan | If you are an employee of a publicly traded company, it most likely offers an #employeestockpurchaseplan, or #ESPP for short. These are excellent plans to take advantage of as they allow employees to purchase company stock at a #discount. However, what most people do not fully understand are the #tax consequences of selling the stock.

With an ESPP, you are not taxed at the time the shares are purchased, but instead only when you sell. As you may expect, the tax consequences of the sale will be different, depending specifically on how long you have held the shares. This holding period will determine if the sale is a #qualifyingdisposition or #disqualifyingdisposition.

Watch this video from our Sacramento Wealth Advisor and CPA, Matt Regan, to learn the taxation rules associated with ESPP plans, and the importance of having a “disposition strategy” that will produce the best economic result for you.

Sacramento Certified Public Account, Matt Regan | Sacramento Wealth Advisor | Sacramento Financial Advisor

If you are an employee of a publicly traded company, it most likely offers an employee stock purchase plan, or ESPP for short. These usually are excellent plans to take advantage of, oftentimes allowing employees to use after-tax payroll deductions to purchase company stock at a discount, which can be as high as 15% off the actual market price of the stock! However, what most people do not fully understand are the tax consequences of selling the stock acquired through these plans. 

Hi Everyone, Matt Regan here from Towerpoint Wealth and today I am going to discuss the taxation rules associated with ESPP plans, understanding the importance of having a “disposition strategy” that will produce the best economic result for you.

With an ESPP, also known as a qualified Section 423 plan, you are not taxed at the time the shares are purchased, but instead only when you sell. Employees can generally sell shares at any time, which is great if you have immediate cash needs, or want to reinvest the money into other assets. However, the tax consequences of the sale will be different, depending specifically on how long you have held the shares. This holding period will determine if the sale is a “qualifying disposition” or “disqualifying disposition,” which governs how much of the gain will be taxed at capital gains rates, or at less favorable ordinary income rates. 

A qualifying disposition occurs when you sell your shares after holding them for at least one year from the purchase date, *and* at least two years from the offering date. The rules say that you will pay ordinary income tax on the lesser of either 1) The discount offered based on the offering date price, or 2) the gain between the actual purchase price and the final sale price. The remainder of the gain, if there is one, will be taxed at the more favorable long-term capital gains rate. 

If you don’t meet the holding period requirements for a qualifying disposition, then by default you end up with a disqualifying disposition. You will pay “regular” ordinary income tax on the difference between the actual purchase price and the purchase date market price, and you’ll pay capital gain tax rates on the difference between the purchase date price and the final sales price.

A little complicated, I know. As you can see, it is incredibly important you understand the ESPP tax rules and how they can impact the amount of money you end up keeping in your pocket, if and when you decide to sell any shares you own in your plan. Feel free to contact me on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Instagram to discuss a disposition strategy that is best for you given your circumstances and financial goals. Thanks, and have a great day.

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Six Strategies to Optimize Your Charitable Intentions 04.13.2021

By: Matt Regan, Wealth Advisor and Steve Pitchford, Director of Tax and Financial Planning
Published: April 13, 2021

Six Strategies to Optimize Your Charitable Intentions | Most individuals who are philanthropically inclined usually just take the path of least resistance and write a check directly to a charity. Of course, this is a straightforward approach and can qualify for an income tax deduction, but when being charitable, there are many different (and often economically more advantageous) options and strategies available to you. Indeed, with strategic and thoughtful planning, a taxpayer may be able to optimize their gifting strategy, meeting multiple objectives by maximizing the economic benefits 1.) to themselves, 2.) to their favorite charities, and even 3.) to their loved ones.

Are you optimizing your philanthropy and gifting strategy? Below you will find a myriad of different charitable strategies we regularly employ for Towerpoint Wealth clients, designed to help you better understand your options.

Cash/Direct to Charity

A cash gift is the simplest and (by far) most popular form of charitable giving.

The income tax deduction[1] for a cash gift is generally equal to the amount of cash donated less the value of any goods or services received in return. And while the benefit of a cash donation is its simplicity, as you will see below, it is not always optimal from a tax and gifting perspective.

Donor-Advised Fund

A Donor-Advised Fund (DAF) is a charitable fund, a 501(c)(3) entity in and of itself, that allows an individual to donate cash or appreciated securities, such as individual stocks, bonds, mutual funds, or exchange-traded funds (ETFs).[2]

Donor Advised Fund DAF Charitable Intentions White Paper

Donating appreciated securities can be a more tax advantageous way to fund a DAF, as donating an investment that has gone up in value generally provides the exact same tax deduction as donating cash, while at the same time provides the extra benefit of eliminating the capital gains tax that a taxpayer would normally pay upon selling the security.

How does it work? The donor makes an irrevocable gift of cash or appreciated securities to a DAF. The donor is then able to decide, on their own timeline, when to grant funds out of the DAF and directly to a charity or charities of their choice. If the contribution is appreciated securities, the DAF is allowed to sell these positions tax-free. The DAF will typically then, at the donor’s discretion, invest the funds in a manner consistent with the donor’s charitable goals and objectives. Once the donor is ready to make a grant from the DAF, he or she simply informs and authorizes the DAF custodian (usually via the custodian’s online platform) to send a check directly to the charity on the donor’s behalf.

Typically, the funding and operational costs of DAFs are low, and our clients also love that they provide a year-end summary report, eliminating the hassle and stress of tracking each contribution/grant out of the DAF individually.

Towerpoint Tip:

At Towerpoint Wealth, we also evaluate “frontloading” a DAF with several years’ worth of potential charitable contributions, allowing a taxpayer to “hurdle” the standard deduction and thus, not only eliminate the future capital gains tax of the donated funds, but also provide them with at least a partial tax deduction for their charitable contributions in a particular tax year.

Private Foundation

A private foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization set up solely for charitable purposes.

A private foundation may be structured either as a corporation managed by a board of directors, or as a trust managed by trustees. Unlike a public charity, the funding for a private foundation typically comes from a single individual, family, or corporation.

The primary benefit of a private foundation is the enhanced control that it provides, as it is able to formulate its own customized charitable gifting approach and platform (and continue to gift directly to other charities as well). A donation to a private foundation is an irrevocable charitable gift, and qualifies for a potential income tax deduction that, for most individuals, will be the exact same as gifting directly to another 501(c)(3) charity.[3]

Importantly, private foundations have administrative and tax reporting requirements that may be costly, and speaking further with a financial advisor and tax professional regarding the benefits and drawbacks of establishing one is recommended.

IRA Qualified Charitable Distribution

Individuals who are over the age of 72 are subject to annual required minimum distributions (RMDs) from their pre-tax IRA(s). These distributions are included on an individual’s tax return as taxable income and are subject to ordinary income tax.

As an alternative to taking a “normal” RMD, an individual can instead execute a Qualified Charitable Distribution (QCD), which allows them to both satisfy their RMD and their charitable intention at the same time.

How does a QCD work? Instead of a “normal” RMD, which usually is deposited into an individual’s checking, savings, or brokerage account, a QCD is paid directly from the IRA to a qualified charity. This distribution not only offsets – or, depending on the amount, fully satisfies – an individual’s RMD, but it is also excluded from taxable income.[4]

And unlike other gifting strategies, a QCD’s net effect as an “above the line” dollar-for-dollar tax deduction can offer additional economic benefits when compared to a “typical” itemized charitable tax deduction.

Charitable Remainder Trust

A charitable remainder trust (CRT) allows a donor to make a future charitable gift, while at the same time, receive an income stream during their lifetime for their own spending goals and needs. There are two types of CRTs: Charitable Remainder Annuity Trusts (CRATs) and Charitable Remainder Unitrusts (CRUTs). The two main differences are how the annual distribution to the income beneficiary(ies) is calculated and how often assets can be contributed to the trusts.[5]

When the donor establishes and contributes to a CRT, they are entitled to a current income tax deduction that is equal to the future expected value of the trust assets that will ultimately pass to the charitable beneficiary(ies). The deduction calculation is based on a number of different factors, such as the annual income stream payout set by the CRT, the age(s) of the income beneficiary(ies), the trust’s specified term of years, and the published IRS monthly interest rate.

At either 1.) the donor’s death, 2.) the death of the beneficiary, or 3.) the completion of the trust’s term, the trustee will distribute the balance of the trust assets directly to the chosen charity(ies).

The primary benefit of a CRT is that an individual may receive a substantial tax deduction in the year they open and fund the CRT, while at the same time, continue to receive income for themselves (or other income beneficiaries) during their lifetime. If the CRT is funded with cash, the donor can claim a deduction of up to 60% of adjusted gross income (AGI); if appreciated assets are used to fund the trust, up to 30% of their AGI may be deducted. In addition, if the trustee decides to sell contributed appreciated securities, he or she can do so tax-free.

Towerpoint Tip:

Opening, funding, and administrating a CRT is complicated and there are important ongoing tax filing obligations. As such, it is highly recommended to work with a trusted financial advisor and tax professional to ensure that a CRT is the right choice. Further, the tax deduction calculation may be audited, so it is important to hire a qualified professional to appraise this value.

Charitable Lead Trust

In the simplest sense, a charitable lead trust (CLT) is the reverse of a CRT. The income generated by the contributed assets is distributed to the chosen charity, and the beneficiaries receive the remainder interest. Like a CRT, a CLT can be an annuity trust (CLAT) or a unitrust (CLUT), but different distribution rules apply.

There are two main types of CLTs: a grantor CLT and a non-grantor CLT. A grantor CLT, like a CRT, is designed to give the donor an upfront charitable income tax deduction. However, to receive the charitable deduction, the donor must be willing to be taxed on all trust income. Since the gift is “for the use of” a charity instead of “to” a charity, cash contributions to a grantor CLT are subject to reduced deduction limits of 30% of AGI, and appreciated asset contributions are subject to deduction limits of 20% of AGI. For non-grantor CLTs, the grantor does not receive a charitable income tax deduction, nor are they taxed on the income of the trust. Instead, the trust pays tax on the income, and the trust claims a charitable deduction for the amounts it pays to the charity. It is very important to note that since they are not tax-exempt, neither type of CLT offers the ability to avoid or defer tax on the sale of appreciated assets like a CRT does.

A CLT may be a better option than a CRT if an individual has no need for current income and wants to ensure that, upon their death, their loved ones receive an inheritance.

Towerpoint Tip:

A charitable lead trust is often structured to provide gift-tax benefits, not necessarily a current income tax deduction. A donor is able to gift more to family members with a reduced gift-tax effect because the gift’s present value is discounted by the calculated income to be paid to the charity(ies). The tax deduction the individual receives is based on the annual amount provided to the charity.

Pooled-Income Fund

A Pooled-Income Fund (PIF) is a type of charitable trust that functions like a mutual fund.

A PIF is comprised of assets from many different donors, pooled and invested together. Each donor is assigned units in the fund that reflect his or her share of the fund’s total assets. Each year, the donors are paid their proportionate share of the net income earned by the fund – the distribution amount depends on the fund’s performance and, importantly, is taxable income to the beneficiary (which is typically the donor but may also be a family member, friend, etc.). At the death of each income beneficiary, the charity receives an amount equal to that donor’s share in the fund.

PIF contributions provide a tax deduction to the donor upon contribution and, like the other charitable gifting vehicles described previously, affords the donor the ability to avoid paying any capital gains taxes on the contributed appreciated securities.

Pooled Income Fund Donor Charity

A primary drawback of a PIF is that the donor has no control over how the assets are invested, as the investment of the fund is directed by a professional manager. As such, it is important that individuals speak with a financial advisor to ensure that a PIF is thoughtfully incorporated into their overall investment allocation and strategy, as well as philanthropic and charitable giving plan.

How can we help?

At Towerpoint Wealth, we are a legal fiduciary to you, and embrace the professional obligation we have to work 100% in your best interests. If you would like to learn more about charitable giving strategies, we encourage you to contact us to open an objective dialogue.

Steve: 916-405-9166, spitchford@towerpointwealth.com
Matt: 916-405-9164, mregan@towerpointwealth.com


[1] In order for an individual to receive a tax deduction, their combined itemized deductions must exceed their standard deduction.

[2] Appreciated securities may be donated directly to certain charities as well. However, doing so is typically an administrative hassle for both the individual and the receiving organization.

[3] Donations to a private foundation are tax deductible up to 30% of adjusted gross income (AGI) for cash, and up to 20% of AGI for appreciated securities, with a five-year carry forward

[4] Up to an annual maximum of $100,000, per taxpayer.

[5] A CRAT pays a fixed percentage (at least 5%) of the trust’s initial value every year until the trust terminates. The donor cannot make additional contributions to a CRAT after the initial contribution. A CRUT, by contrast, pays a fixed percentage (at least 5%) of the trust’s value as determined annually. A donor can make additional contributions to a CRUT.

Matt Regan No Comments

401(k) Loans 03.31.01

401(k) Loans | You’ve recently made some money in the stock market and interest rates are still low, so you decide it is the perfect time to buy a home. But there is a dilemma – which assets should be used, and which accounts should be drawn from to fund the down payment? Should you liquidate investments held in your “regular” non-retirement account, or should you borrow from your 401(k)?

Many people don’t like the idea of funding a down payment by selling investments in a “regular” non-retirement account because of the possible income tax consequences. Instead, they sometimes choose to borrow from their 401(k), saying to themselves: I can save money NOW by borrowing from myself, AND I am paying myself interest on the loan! Sounds harmless, right? Not so fast!

Watch this video from our Sacramento Wealth Advisor and CPA, Matt Regan, to learn why treating your 401(k) like a piggy bank could have a material impact to your retirement plan and longer-term economic health.

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Dollar-cost Averaging 03.05.2021

We hear people say it all the time. “I’m just waiting for the stock market to pull back, and then I’ll invest more” or “I’m going to build my cash for awhile and then invest it,” or “Things are too uncertain, or scary, or unpredictable right now – I am going to wait to invest for the time being.” Perhaps you have heard friends or colleagues say these things. Perhaps you have said them yourself?

When I hear people say things like this, I immediately think of the possible opportunities that person may miss out on by not taking more immediate and decisive action. This kind of investor behavior, while common among inexperienced or fearful investors, or among those who are not following a disciplined plan, can be problematic, but fortunately, easily improved upon by implementing a dollar-cost averaging strategy.

Watch this video, Dollar-cost Averaging, from our Sacramento Wealth Advisor and CPA, Matt Regan, to learn how the use of dollar-cost averaging helps overcome emotional investing and is one of the best ways to grow and protect your portfolio over time.

Matt Regan No Comments

Student Debt: Tackle it Now!

Student Debt | You’ve graduated college, there is so much to look forward to and be excited about! Your first professional job, making money, traveling to new places, meeting new people, and no more studying! But for 44 million Americans, there is one part of college that unfortunately sticks with them for quite awhile: student loans.

Among the Class of 2019, 69% of college students took out student loans, graduating with an average debt of about $30,000. Most people believe that if they pay more than the minimum monthly amount, they won’t have extra cash for travel, nice things, and possibly even to invest. However, with the average student loan interest rate of 6%, it might sound crazy but it’s true: Even if you did invest that extra money, you might not break even!

Watch this video from our Sacramento Wealth Advisor and CPA, Matt Regan, to learn how making sacrifices and staying motivated can help you pay off your student debt sooner, save you money, and achieve greater peace of mind and full financial freedom.

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Five Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Became A Founder 02.12.2021

Our President, Joseph F. Eschleman, CIMA®, was interviewed by Candice Georgiadis, a contributing writer to Authority Magazine, as part of her series about leadership lessons of accomplished business leaders. Joseph’s story and message does an excellent job of summarizing not only how passionate and driven he is as President and founder of Towerpoint Wealth, but also the grit, tenacity, and hard work it takes to build and grow an individual advisory practice, and to then pivot, and ultimately build and grow a $300 million boutique wealth management firm.

Click HERE to read the Joseph Eschleman / Towerpoint Wealth story!